The Song of the Wandering Aengus

BY WILLIAM BUTLER YEATS

“I went out to the hazel wood,
Because a fire was in my head,
And cut and peeled a hazel wand,
And hooked a berry to a thread;
And when white moths were on the wing,
And moth-like stars were flickering out,
I dropped the berry in a stream
And caught a little silver trout.

“When I had laid it on the floor
I went to blow the fire a-flame,
But something rustled on the floor,
And someone called me by my name:
It had become a glimmering girl
With apple blossom in her hair
Who called me by my name and ran
And faded through the brightening air.

“Though I am old with wandering
Through hollow lands and hilly lands,
I will find out where she has gone,
And kiss her lips and take her hands;
And walk among long dappled grass,
And pluck till time and times are done,
The silver apples of the moon,
The golden apples of the sun.”

Source: The Wind Among the Reeds (1899) and
https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/55687/the-song-of-wandering-aengus

I especially loved the use of this poem in the Star Trek Enterprise episode, “Rogue Planet”.

Of its meaning and inspiration: ‘Yeats later said that “the poem was suggested to me by a Greek folk song; but the folk belief of Greece is very like that of Ireland, and I certainly thought, when I wrote it, of Ireland, and of the spirits that are in Ireland.”‘
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Song_of_Wandering_Aengus

Apple blossom

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